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Windsor Castle Tickets & Tours

Windsor Castle is one of the Royal Family's most prestigious residencies, along with the likes of Buckingham Palace in London and Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh. On 19th May 2018, St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle will play host to the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle. 

Built in the 11th century, the castle has been home to English royals for more than 1,000 years and is the longest-occupied palace in Europe.

Located in Berkshire, the castle is a stunning display of architecture and is often selected to host important ceremonial events, such as meetings with foreign dignitaries. 

The castle provides an exquisite view of the River Thames and Windsor Forest, a popular hunting ground for past monarchs.
 

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Windsor Castle, London, is the oldest and largest occupied castle in the world, one of the official residences of the Queen, and represents 900 years of British history.

How big is Windsor Castle? 

Windsor Castle is the biggest house in the world, comprising more than 1,000 rooms, 13 acres of land, and more than 45,000 square metres of floor space. 

The castle was built by William the Conqueror following the Battle of Normandy and was originally made out of wood in a traditional motte-and-bailey style. In 1100, the castle became home to Henry VII, who set about extending the castle, replacing the wood with stone and turning it into a palace fit for a king.

Which monarchs have lived in the castle?

The castle has been home to some of England's most famous monarchs, including Henry VIII and his father, Henry VII, both of whom were buried in the castle's Lady Chapel. In total, 39 English royals have officially lived at the palace. 

Windsor was the favourite residence of Queen Victoria and her husband, Prince Albert. Following Albert's death, Victoria took to wearing only black and was often referred to as the Widow of Windsor. 

Today, the castle is home to Queen Elizabeth II and is occupied by the Queen and her husband, Prince Philip, every year during the Easter period. The castle is also the Queen’s residence of choice during her private weekends, along with Holyrood Palace. 

Visiting Windsor Castle

The castle is open to visitors throughout the year, opening at 09:30 and closing at 17:30. In the winter months (November to February), the castle opens slightly later at 09:45 and closes at 16:15. 

The Changing of the Guard happens every morning between 11:00 and 11:30. Tours of the castle are extremely popular, particularly in the summer time, and usually take around 2-3 hours to complete. 

The Royal Wedding

In May 2018, Windsor Castle will host the royal wedding of Prince Harry and his bride, Megan Markle. 

The wedding will be officiated in St George's Chapel, the castle's official place of worship. Located in the Lower Ward, the Chapel was originally built in the 14th century by Edward VIII, before being significantly extended in the 15th century. The Church is now able to hold more than 800 guests and has been the location of many royal weddings, christenings and funerals, including the wedding of Prince Charles of Wales and Camilla Parker Bowles, as well as the christening of Prince Harry. 

In autumn 2018, the chapel will also play host to the wedding of Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank. 

Parking at Windsor Castle

Working out where to park can be daunting, but there are plenty of car parks in Windsor's town centre, as well as a park-and-ride service offering lifts to key attractions in the area. 

Bear in mind when driving into the town that traffic is temporarily stopped every morning while the guards make their way between the barracks.

Please note: Windsor Castile will be open Easter Sunday, from 13:00.


What to look out for at Windsor Castle

There’s so much to see at Windsor Castle, it’s hard to know where to begin! Here are some of our favourite attractions from the tour:
The State Apartments: Windsor Castle’s lavishly decorated State Apartments hold a large collection of fine art and paintings that are stunning to behold. If you visit between September and March, you’ll be able to explore the Semi-State Rooms, which were created for George VI and are now used by The Queen for official entertaining.

St George’s Chapel: In the grounds of Windsor Castle, you’ll find St. George’s Chapel, an active centre of worship, where Prince Edward was married and Henry VIII was laid to rest.
 
Queen Mary’s Dolls’ House: Another must-see attraction at Windsor Castle is Queen Mary’s world-famous Dolls’ House, complete with working lifts, water and electricity supply! It has its own library, full of original works by the top literary names of the day, as well as a beautiful garden and a wine cellar.

Changing the Guard: This spectacular ceremony begins as the Windsor Castle Guard line up outside the Guard Room, until a regimental band, corps of drums or pipe band heralds the entrance of the new Guard. This 45-minute ceremony is part of London’s patriotic culture and is the ultimate spectacle to witness when you visit Windsor Castle.

Windsor Castle facts

Windsor Castle was Queen Victoria’s main place of residence. After Prince Albert passed away, she was often referred to as ‘the Widow of Windsor’.

During World War II, the Royal Family secretly slept in Windsor Castle. The public believed they were sleeping in Buckingham Palace during this time.

There was a huge fire at Windsor Castle in November 1992, damaging more than 100 rooms. The restoration cost almost £40 million.

16 hours to move every clock forward when British Summer Time begins, and 18 hours to move them back again in the winter!clock makerThe Windsor Castle estate has more than 450 clocks. It takes the

The castle’s Great Kitchen is home to a whisk that can hold up to 250 eggs at a time, and the cellar holds around 18,000 bottles of wine.

The clocks in the Great Kitchen are always 5 minutes fast, so that the Queen’s food is never served late.

Tickets purchased through 365 Tickets cannot be upgraded to yearly passes
 

Windsor Castle, the largest and oldest occupied castle in the world, is one of the official residences of Her Majesty The Queen. The Castle's dramatic site encapsulates 900 years of British history. It covers an area of 26 acres and contains, as well as a royal palace, a magnificent chapel and the homes and workplaces of a large number of people.

What there is to see:
The magnificent State Apartments are furnished with some of the finest works of art from the Royal Collection, including paintings by Rembrandt, Rubens and the famous triple portrait of Charles I by Sir Anthony van Dyck.  In 1992 fire destroyed or damaged more than 100 rooms at the Castle. By good fortune the rooms worst affected were empty at the time, and as a result, few of the Castle's artistic treasures were destroyed.  The highly acclaimed restoration work, completed in 1997, is a testament to the extraordinary skills of some of the finest craftsmen in Europe. From October to March visitors can also enjoy George IV's private apartments (the Semi-State Rooms), among the most richly decorated interiors in the Castle.

St George's Chapel is one of the finest examples of Gothic architecture in England. It is the spiritual home of the Order of the Garter, the senior order of British Chivalry established in 1348 by Edward III. Within the chapel are the tombs of ten sovereigns, including Henry VIII and his third wife Jane Seymour, and Charles I. Among the highlights of a visit to Windsor is Queen Mary's Dolls' House, the most famous dolls' house in the world.

Photographer Credits:

Image 1: Photographer: Mark Fiennes, Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2013

Image 2: Photographer: Dennis Gilbert, Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2013

Image 3: Photographer: Ian Jones, Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2013

Image 4: Photographer: John Freeman, Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2013



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Windsor Castle is the oldest and largest occupied castle in the world, one of the official residences of the Queen, and represents 900 years of British history.

Windsor Castle, the largest and oldest occupied castle in the world, is one of the official residences of Her Majesty The Queen of England.

The Castle's dramatic site encapsulates 900 years of British history. It covers an area of 26 acres and contains, as well as a royal palace, a magnificent chapel and the homes and workplaces of a large number of people.

Multimedia tours & Precincts Tour are included in the ticket price!

The State Apartments

Windsor Castle has been the home of 39 monarchs, and the appearance of the State Apartments today reflects the changing tastes of the Castle’s royal occupants, particularly Charles II (r.1660-85) and George IV (r.1820-30).

The State Apartments are furnished with some of the finest works of art from the Royal Collection, including paintings by Rembrandt, Rubens and Van Dyck. 

Many of the works of art are still in the historic settings for which they were first collected or commissioned by the Kings and Queens who have lived at Windsor.

Today Windsor's State Apartments are frequently used by members of the Royal Family for events in support of organisations of which they are patrons.

Queen Mary’s Dolls’ House

Among the highlights of a visit to Windsor is Queen Mary’s Dolls’ House, the largest, most beautiful and most famous dolls’ house in the world.

Built for Queen Mary by the leading British architect Sir Edwin Lutyens between 1921 and 1924, this most magical of residences is a perfect replica in miniature of an aristocratic home.

Precincts Tour of Windsor Castle

As the perfect start to your visit, you can join a free 30-minute tour of the Castle Precincts. The tours are led by the Wardens, dressed in their striking red and black Windsor livery, and depart at regular intervals throughout the day from the Courtyard at the start of the visit.

Precinct tour times are advertised on a poster adjacent to the building from which multimedia tours are issued.

The Precincts tour introduces the Castle’s 900-year history as a fortress and palace, and its role today as an official residence of The Queen. 

It ends at the entrance to the State Apartments on Henry VIII’s North Terrace, from where spectacular views of the surrounding countryside can be enjoyed.

The Semi-State Rooms

One of the best times of the year to visit Windsor Castle is between September and March, when the spectacular private apartments created for George IV are open.

These Semi-State Rooms are among the most richly decorated interiors in the Castle and are used by The Queen for official entertaining. 

George IV had a well-developed love of fine objects and a taste for the theatrical.

With his architect, Sir Jeffry Wyatville, he completely remodelled the Castle’s exterior during the 1820s, giving it the romantic and picturesque appearance seen today.

He also decided to create a new suite of private rooms on the sunnier east and south sides of the Castle. This was George IV’s last and greatest commission, and one of the most lavish and costly interior decoration schemes ever carried out in England.